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 Post subject: What is the source for the "start his own religion" quote?
PostPosted: Wed Apr 11, 2012 2:46 pm 
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Operation Cambake and others often quote L. Ron Hubard with these words:

Quote:
"Writing for a penny a word is ridiculous. If a man really wants to make a million dollars, the best way would be to start his own religion"

The only source is apparently the Reader's Digest reprint, May 1980, p.1

For example, http://www.xenu.net/roland-intro.html

Where did Hubbard write or say this? When? What was the context? Is the quote documented anywhere besides the undocumented Reader's Digest reprint?

I would like to use the quote, but nothing I can find stands up to the normal standards of veracity.


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 Post subject: Re: What is the source for the "start his own religion" quot
PostPosted: Wed Apr 11, 2012 3:58 pm 
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I have seen that quote many times but I have also read that someone suggested he start his own religion after he complained about writing for a penny a word. I believe it was mentioned twice in Bare Faced Messiah, but I dont know if the source is listed. There is a copy of the book here on http://www.xenu.net

Mod edit: Direct link to webbed version of Bare Face Messiah by Russell Miller. http://www.xenu.net/archive/books/bfm/bfmconte.htm


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 Post subject: Re: What is the source for the "start his own religion" quot
PostPosted: Wed Apr 11, 2012 4:25 pm 
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Bare Face Messiah by Russell Miller, Chapter 9.
http://www.xenu.net/archive/books/bfm/bfm09.htm
Quote:
The Strange Début of Dianetics

'My vanity hopes that you will secure credit to me for eleven years of unpaid research, but my humanity hopes above that that this science will be used as intelligently and extensively as possible, for it is a science and it does produce exact results uniformly and can, I think, be of benefit.' (Letter from L.R. Hubbard to Dr Joseph Winter, August 1949)

* * * * *

In the spring of 1949, Ron and Sara had moved to the New Jersey shore, to a beach cottage at Bay Head, a discreetly genteel yachting resort on the northern tip of Barnegat Bay. Rich New Yorkers who could not quite afford the Hamptons kept large summer houses at Bay Head where they sailed the ruffled blue waters of the bay, played tennis and attended each other's cocktail parties. The Hubbards' rented cottage was one of the smallest properties, but Sara, who suspected she was pregnant, was delighted with it. She was weary of their peripatetic lifestyle; she calculated that in only three years of marriage they had set up home in seven different States and had never stayed in one place for more than a few months. Bay Head, with its country club aura, did much to lift her spirits.

John Campbell had persuaded them to move from Georgia and had found them the cottage which was less than a hour's drive on the Garden State Parkway from Plainfield, where he and his wife lived. He wanted Ron close by because he wanted, passionately wanted, to be involved in what he considered to be the historic genesis of Dianetics.

It was predictable, in the course of their working relationship as science-fiction editor and science-fiction writer, that Campbell and Hubbard would spend time together discussing ideas and that Ron would test his theories on a man as responsive as the editor of Astounding. Campbell was an intellectual maverick: he had studied physics and chemistry at college, had a mechanistic approach to psychology and was fascinated by gimmicks and technology, but he also flirted with psychic phenomena like dowsing, telekinesis,


p.147

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

telepathy and clairvoyance. Ron could not have had a more attentive audience when he first began to propound his theory that the brain worked like a computer which could be made markedly more efficient by clearing its clogged memory bank.

Always a persuasive talker, Hubbard possessed a natural ability to marshal a smattering of knowledge into a cogent and authoritative thesis, interwoven with scientific and medical jargon. His 'scientific' approach to unravelling the mysteries of the human psyche precisely accorded with Campbell's own view that humanity could be investigated with the techniques and impersonal methodology of the exact sciences,[1] and although Ron's ideas stemmed more from his exuberant imagination than from any research, to Campbell what Hubbard had to say was tantamount to a revelation on the road to Damascus.

He compared individual memory to a 'time-track' on which every experience was recorded. Using a form of hypnosis, he believed painful experiences could be recalled and 'erased' with consequent beneficial effects to both physical and mental health. Ron offered to demonstrate on a convenient couch at Campbell's home in Plainfield. He drew the blinds, told Campbell to relax, close his eyes on a count to seven and try to recall his earliest childhood experience. Gently prompted by Ron to produce more and more details, Campbell was surprised to find he could resurrect long-forgotten incidents with such clarity that it was as if he had physically returned to the time and place. After a couple of sessions, he seemed to be able to go back far enough to actually re-live the astonishing experience of his birth and at the same time he discovered that the chronic sinusitis that had plagued him all his life was much improved.

Thereafter, Campbell was the first committed disciple of Dianetics, utterly convinced that L. Ron Hubbard had made profound discoveries about the workings of the mind and that the fundamental nature of human life was about to be changed for the better. [Hubbard himself was perhaps as concerned to make money as he was to help humanity and he had some interesting ideas about how to do it. Around this time he was invited to address a science-fiction group in Newark hosted by the writer, Sam Moskowitz. 'Writing for a penny a word is ridiculous,' he told the meeting. 'If a man really wanted to make a million dollars, the best way to do it would be to start his own religion.'[2]]

[...]

_______________
[1]. The Universe Makers, Donald Wollheim, 1971
[2]. Los Angeles Times, 27 August 1978


p.148



Here's some comprehesive analysis on the topic at xenu-directory.net.....
Non-scientologist FAQ on "Start a Religion" By Donald C. Lindsay. 15 January 1999
(with additions by webmaster Ray Hill)
http://www.xenu-directory.net/opinions/ ... 90117.html

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 Post subject: Re: What is the source for the "start his own religion" quot
PostPosted: Thu Apr 12, 2012 12:42 am 
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nolo contendere wrote:
Operation Cambake and others often quote L. Ron Hubard with these words:

Quote:
"Writing for a penny a word is ridiculous. If a man really wants to make a million dollars, the best way would be to start his own religion"

The only source is apparently the Reader's Digest reprint, May 1980, p.1

For example, http://www.xenu.net/roland-intro.html

Where did Hubbard write or say this? When? What was the context? Is the quote documented anywhere besides the undocumented Reader's Digest reprint?

I would like to use the quote, but nothing I can find stands up to the normal standards of veracity.

This quotation is attributed to a sci-fi writer, Harlan Ellison. According to Ellison, Hubbard uttered this phrase in his presence.

Welcome to the board, nolo!

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“This OT shit is driving me insane. On a positive side, I laugh a lot these days because I’m at a funny farm.”
L. Ron Hubbard

L. Ron Hubbard era un maestro de masturbacion fisica y mental.


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 Post subject: Re: What is the source for the "start his own religion" quot
PostPosted: Thu Apr 12, 2012 12:28 pm 
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As I pointed out, check this: http://www.xenu-directory.net/opinions/ ... 90117.html

Donald C. Lindsay, from his article on xenu-directory.net" wrote:
To summarize: we have nine witnesses: Neison Himmel, Sam Merwin, Sam Moskowitz, Theodore Sturgeon, Lloyd Arthur Eshbach, Harlan Ellison, and the three unnamed witnesses of Robert Vaughn Young. There is some confusion and doubt about one of them (Sam Moskowitz). Two are reported via Russel Miller: one is reported via Mike Jittlov: one reported in his autobiography; one reported in an affidavit; and one reported to me in person. The reports describe different events, meaning that Hubbard said it at perhaps six times, in six different venues — definitely not just once. And the Church's official disclaimer is now reportedly a flat lie.

Conclusion: He definitely said it more than once.

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 Post subject: Re: What is the source for the "start his own religion" quot
PostPosted: Thu Apr 12, 2012 7:15 pm 
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"I’d like to start a religion. That’s where the money is."
- L. Ron Hubbard to Lloyd Eshbach in 1949, quoted by Eshbach in OVER MY SHOULDER: REFLECTIONS ON A SCIENCE FICTION ERA. Donald M. Grant Publisher, 1983

http://www.xenu.net/archive/infopack/


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 Post subject: Re: What is the source for the "start his own religion" quot
PostPosted: Sun Apr 15, 2012 12:02 pm 
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Thanks for the link. That is an amazing story! So many variations of words, dates, and contexts, and each one purporting to be a literal quote. Either Hubbard was fond of the concept and mentioned it every week or two, or many people are remembering the same incident differently.

But the more I read the statement, the odder it gets. I know of very few religion-starters in history who got rich or led easy lives. Hubbard's quote is off-the wall. Many cult originators have been persecuted, most simply went broke and died in obscurity. Joseph Smith had multiple wives but died from gunshot trying to escape a lynch-mob.

Starting a religion would not be an informed choice by anyone who had studied a history of religions. Hubbard was not an ignorant man. Why would he say that?


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 Post subject: Re: What is the source for the "start his own religion" quot
PostPosted: Mon Apr 16, 2012 8:00 am 
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nolo contendere wrote:
Why would he say that?


Because he meant it and in fact what he said is true?

Or, because he also stated that "I have high hopes of smashing my name into history so violently that it will take a legendary form, even if all the books are destroyed"
Whatever the case may be, scientology itself is fighting a losing battle and nothing can evah reverse the momentum of truth about hubbard and his eventual mind-rapes called scientology/dianetics.

*happy dance*

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"If anyone talks about a "road to Freedom" he is talking about a linear line. This, then, must have boundaries. If there are boundaries there is no freedom." - Dianetics 55


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