St. Louis Schools Reject SCN Applied Scholastics * P.R. 9/25

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Tigger
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St. Louis Schools Reject SCN Applied Scholastics * P.R. 9/25

Post by Tigger » Sun Sep 25, 2005 11:43 pm

St. Louis school system rejects Scientology's Applied Scholastics program
http://www.pressbox.co.uk/detailed/Educ ... 37342.html


Education: St. Louis school system rejects Scientology's Applied Scholastics program

Added: (Sun Sep 25 2005)

The St. Louis Post Dispatch reported on September 22 that the district's superintendent of education has decided that teachers will no longer participate in training programs offered by Applied Scholastics International, a front group of the Church of Scientology. Teachers who had attended these programs were uncomfortable with what they saw there, and complained to their union. School Board member Bill Purdy called for an investigation of the program last week, and after visiting the center, expressed his own concerns about all the materials being labeled 'based on the works of L. Ron Hubbard.'

Mr. Purdy was right to be concerned. What Applied Scholastics promotes as
secular "study technology" is actually covert instruction in the Scientology religion. The practices of "word clearing" and "clay table demos" come directly from the Technical Bulletins of Dianetics and Scientology, volumes found in every Scientology church. ASI's supposedly secular textbooks teach three versions of word clearing: methods 3, 9, and 7. What they doh't disclose is that methods 1, 2, 4, and 5 involve use of the E-meter, a crude lie detector device that Scientology insists be used only for spiritual counseling by trained Scientology ministers, called "auditors".

Education experts such as Johanna Lemlech at USC, Sidnie Myrick at
UCLA, MaryEllen Vogt at Cal State Long Beach, and Victoria Purcell-Gates at Harvard (now at Michigan State) have dismissed study technology as educationally unsound and potentially harmful.

Applied Scholastics' parent organization, the Association for Better Living and Education (ABLE), is run by members of Scientology's paramilitary Sea
Organization. Sea Org members sign billion year contracts promising to serve the church over countless reincarnations. ABLE's regional offices in cities like New York and Clearwater are in Church of Scientology buildings. Furthermore, ABLE and Applied Scholastics are listed as "Scientology-affiliated entities" in the Church of Scientology's filings with the US Internal Revenue Service.

More information about study technology and Applied Scholastics International is available at http://StudyTech.org.

The St. Louis school board would do well to visit that web site if ASI presses for reconsideration of their decision.

Scientology's "study technology" has no place in the public schools.

Submitted by: StudyTech.org
info@studytech.org

mhawthorne64
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Post by mhawthorne64 » Mon Sep 26, 2005 8:20 pm

Is this true?

ASI's supposedly secular textbooks teach three versions of word clearing: methods 3, 9, and 7. What they doh't disclose is that methods 1, 2, 4, and 5 involve use of the E-meter, a crude lie detector device that Scientology insists be used only for spiritual counseling by trained Scientology ministers, called "auditors".

And if so, why is it relevant? In my admittedly limited exposure to Scn word clearing, what I was taught at Delphi re: wordclearing involved a dictionary and using the word in a sentence. Nothing darkly sinister there. I can't believe they (ASI) were trying to teach non-Scn teachers anything about e-meters and metered word clearing. And the fact that they simply EXIST... well that's a rather sketchy rationalization for not checking out something that might benefit the kids.

Side note: Is there a Method 6 and/or 8?

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Post by Don Carlo » Mon Sep 26, 2005 10:19 pm

The Hidden Message in L. Ron's Study Tech by Dr. David Touretzky shows how the Study Tech is a pipeline straight into Scientology.

(I have mispelled this guy's name every which way in the past, so sorry, Dr. T.)

In my opinion, the study tech teaches you how to decode and accept what you are reading, rather than questioning it. It focusses on the passive act of swallowing rather than the active act of writing.
Last edited by Don Carlo on Mon Sep 26, 2005 10:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.

mhawthorne64
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Post by mhawthorne64 » Mon Sep 26, 2005 10:29 pm

Am I way off base here?

My experience with Study Tech taught me that it was a tool to better understanding. While I shudder to attribute it to LRH (dictionaries were compiled long before LRH was compiled, and cave paintings could be considered the earliest form of demoing a concept for betterunderstanding), it's a no-brainer that you can't understand a concept if you don't understand the terminology used to describe that concept... whether it's a SCN concept or a secular concept.

Agreed, the study tech I used at Delphi was pretty low-gradient compared to what one might encounter in an Org (no e-meters inour academy), but the fundamental concept is the same.

It seems to me that one would be more apt to accept a precept that they didn't understand without question rather than blindly swallow something they fully understood and had issues with.

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Post by Don Carlo » Mon Sep 26, 2005 10:45 pm

That's like saying that Hubbard encouraged communication and therefore anyone against Hubbard is against communication.

Of course understanding a word is important and is the cornerstone of decoding a written page, and centuries ago dictionaries were invented to help with this.

Working in clay as an educational tool, orginally invented by Maria Montessori, is also great, but is appropriate for very young children. Try doing a clay demo of the word "irony."

Doing step-by-step gradients is done by a mother cat bringing a live, crippled mouse to her kittens to practice on. Johan S. Bach wrote short musical exercises to teach the piano and violin before teaching complex concertos. Learning by gradients is everywhere already!

So the useful parts of the study tech weren't invented by Hubbard and are already used widely, ALONG WITH many great ideas not in the study tech, like critical thinking.

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Post by mhawthorne64 » Mon Sep 26, 2005 11:14 pm

Don Carlo wrote:That's like saying that Hubbard encouraged communication and therefore anyone against Hubbard is against communication.
Ummm... not sure what you're referring to... or what you mean.

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Post by Don Carlo » Mon Sep 26, 2005 11:23 pm

I was referring to your last sentence, that one would be more likely to be a blind follower if one didn't understand the words. It's as though I was advocating not looking up words! My message is that the good parts of the study tech (the parts Hubbard didn't invent), are already in schools (like communication, another concept Hubbard didn't invent) and the best thing is to use dictionaries, concrete visualization, and gradients AND everything that has been discovered since Hubbard.

Another analogy is that Narconon accuses its critics of "not wanting to keep kids off drugs." Wrong. Critics dislike Narconon because it's a pipeline to Scientology, it's staffed by poorly trained ex-druggies, AND it's ineffective and dangerous, not because critics want kids to be drug addicts.

mhawthorne64
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Post by mhawthorne64 » Mon Sep 26, 2005 11:38 pm

Don Carlo wrote:I was referring to your last sentence, that one would be more likely to be a blind follower if one didn't understand the words. It's as though I was advocating not looking up words! My message is that the good parts of the study tech (the parts Hubbard didn't invent), are already in schools (like communication, another concept Hubbard didn't invent) and the best thing is to use dictionaries, concrete visualization, and gradients AND everything that has been discovered since Hubbard.
It was not my intent to infer that you were advocating not looking up words! I do agree that the basics of study tech are already in schools. I tend to think that a lot of teachers don't impress the importance of defining words (beyond the big words) if a student isn't comprehending.

Sorry if I was mis-duplicating your ideas, or if it seemed I was putting words in your mouth. Again, that was not my intention.

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Post by Don Carlo » Tue Sep 27, 2005 12:26 am

Thanks, mhawthorne,
There are incompetent teachers in public and private schools that don't teach kids how to use a dictionary, and the importance of mastering things step by step. I wish everyone had English teachers as good as the ones I had.

These days I just look up words on Internet dictionaries. I've peeped through the windows at the local CoS mission and seen an empty room with dictionaries and Hubbard books. I bet now kids use cell phones to look up words on the Internet. Once again CoS is stuck in the mid-1950's, a twentieth century religion in a twenty-first century world.

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Post by Ladybird » Tue Sep 27, 2005 9:19 am

At the beginning of every scientology book or course is an "IMPORTANT NOTE".

It is a whole page, but the essence is this sentence:

"The only reason a person gives up a study or becomes confused or unable to learn is because he or she has gone past a word that was misunderstood." - LRH

Thus, the student of scientology (who may or may not have ever cracked a dictionary, though they have been around since time immemorial) is taught that if he disagrees with anything L.Ron Hubbard ever said or wrote, it is because he has a misunderstood word.

Thus, the acolyte is pressured to find that pesky misunderstood word, and gets lost in the significance of definitions, grammar, usage, etiology, etc. ad infinitum.

If simply looking up the word does not cause the student to "duplicate" (agree with) LRH, then we have word clearing methods 1 through 9.

These word clearing methods are quite elaborate, 1, 2 and 4 are done on the meter, there are strict rules for the proper use of the others. It is like 3 pages in the dictionary, so I am not going to copy them here. They are probably on line some where already.

The idea that what you are reading is a bunch of crap is not an option.


There's more, much more...Ladybird

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Post by Ladybird » Wed Oct 26, 2005 10:58 pm

http://www.riverfronttimes.com/Issues/2 ... /news.html


==========


News Real


L Is for L. Ron
The state approves a tutoring program linked to Scientology, and
everybody cries foul


By Kristen Hinman


Published: Wednesday, October 26, 2005


In July 2003, a nonprofit called Applied Scholastics International
opened a spanking-new headquarters on 55 acres in Spanish Lake. Among
those who attended the festivities were U.S. Congressman William
"Lacy" Clay and actors Tom Cruise and Anne Archer. Newspapers from
coast to coast published stories heralding the group's move from LA to
the great Midwest.


After the initial fanfare, Applied Scholastics quietly went about its
business: pitching tutoring services to local groups with after-school
programs and looking to ally with prominent urban-education
researchers, Washington University's Garrett Duncan among them.


Fast-forward two years to the fall of 2005. Applied Scholastics makes
headlines once again, but this time the occasion is no celebration:
Two local school districts, St. Louis and Hazelwood, say the group
isn't welcome in their classrooms.


As reported in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, St. Louis Public Schools
superintendent Creg Williams last month told area principals to quit
sending teachers to professional-development workshops at Applied
Scholastics. And in early October, Hazelwood School District
superintendent Chris Wright penned a letter to the nonprofit's CEO,
Bennetta Slaughter, admonishing the organization to stop claiming a
"partnership" with Hazelwood.


What's so repugnant about Applied Scholastics?


"We know that some of their learning strategies are specifically
referred to in the Scientology doctrine," Wright sums up.


This is by no means the first time Scientologists have been accused of
attempting to infiltrate public-school classrooms. In 1997 officials
in California fended off a bid to allow Scientology founder L. Ron
Hubbard's teaching materials into classrooms. Just last week came
reports that a school district in San Antonio, Texas, was under fire
for purchasing textbooks written by Hubbard.


The fuss isn't so much a church-state issue as it is skepticism
regarding Scientology itself. Followers of Hubbard, a science-fiction
writer who founded the church in 1954, see themselves as immortal
spirits hindered by numerous mental blocks, or "engrams." "Clearing"
the blocks can lead to spiritual awakening and a happy life, free of
addiction. Scientologists eschew psychiatry and traditional counseling
in favor of "auditing" sessions in which one church member questions
another about painful memories and helps to "clear" him.


Despite the limelight afforded by adherents like Cruise, John Travolta
and Kirstie Alley, some have called Scientology a cult. In a 1984
opinion, a judge in Los Angeles wrote that "[Scientology] is nothing
in reality but a vast enterprise to extract the maximum amount of
money from its adepts by pseudo-scientific theories." More recently
television viewers saw an emotional Cruise decry psychiatry on the
Today show and tell Larry King that Hubbard's study methods cured his
dyslexia.


Enter Applied Scholastics, which uses texts authored by Hubbard.
Though the books don't overtly make the link between the writer and
the religion, St. Louis Board of Education member Bill Purdy points
out that titles like Learning How to Learn and How to Use a Dictionary
prominently feature Hubbard's name on their covers. And each contains
a directory of Scientology churches in the U.S. Walk into one of the
churches, and a congregant will tell you the books are used in classes
there. "Clearly the books are based on L. Ron Hubbard's belief
system," says Purdy.


Applied Scholastics' methodology (which Hubbard calls "Study
Technology") holds that students have trouble in school because they
never learn how to learn. Hubbard's books identify three main
barriers: "lack of mass" (a paucity of visual aids and diagrams);
"skipped gradient" (failing to allow students to master simple steps
in a complex lesson); and the "misunderstood word" (a weak
vocabulary).


Chris Wright says Applied Scholastics personnel "aggressively" began
trying to partner with her district almost as soon as the group took
up residence in Spanish Lake. "They wanted to provide us with
materials and training for our teachers," says the Hazelwood
superintendent. "They wanted to come into our schools and do tutoring,
a number of activities."


In response, Wright asked her staff to look into the program. She says
they searched in vain for independent academic research that supports
the method. Instead they found critics like David Touretzky, a
computer-science professor at Carnegie Mellon University who operates
a Web site called www.studytech.org.


"Applied Scholastics is Scientology. They're no different," asserts
Touretzky, who has spent a decade probing Scientology and Applied
Scholastics and posting his findings on studytech.org along with links
to pertinent news stories. He says "learning how to learn" and
overcoming the three barriers to learning comprise fundamental
Scientology principles.


"Applied Scholastics teaches you nine different methods of 'word
clearing,' or looking up words in dictionaries, for example. These
same methods are laid out in Scientology scripture," Touretzky points
out.


Applied Scholastics spokeswoman Mary Adams dismisses Touretzky as "a
little bit loony" and notes that his personal page on Carnegie
Mellon's Web site contains instructions for homemade bombs. (The site
is filled with information concerning First Amendment issues, another
of Touretzky's passions.) "L. Ron Hubbard developed the educational
materials and gifted them to Applied Scholastics in 1972. They have
nothing whatsoever to do with religion," Adams says. "He happens to be
the founder of the Church of Scientology."


"That's exactly where the danger is," counters Judith Cochran, an
education professor at the University of Missouri-St. Louis and
director of the E. Desmond Lee Regional Institute of Tutorial
Education. "How does a guy that starts a religion know what's needed
academically?"


Adds Cochran's UMSL colleague Kathleen Sullivan Brown: "I am aware of
research on effective strategies for learning, and this is not one of
them."


Adams blames Purdy and public-schools gadfly Peter Downs for thrusting
her organization under the media's microscope. Last month, after some
St. Louis teachers complained to local union officials about being
sent to workshops at Applied Scholastics, Purdy and Downs toured the
facility, after which the latter wrote a story that was published in
the St. Louis Argus.


In his article, Downs reported that Missouri's Department of
Elementary and Secondary Education had recently approved Applied
Scholastics as a Supplemental Educational Service. This cleared the
way for the group to tutor low-income children in underperforming
schools statewide, as mandated by the federal No Child Left Behind
law. The service is funded with federal money.


"The whole point of this tutoring is to get kids back on grade level,"
Downs argues. "But there's nothing in the Applied Scholastics
curriculum designed to do that. It teaches kids what L. Ron Hubbard
has to say about the barriers to learning and tells them to go back on
their own and pick up what they missed. I think that's a crock."


Responds Adams: "The gentleman has an agenda, and he's using our big
name to forward it."


In his Argus article, Downs wrote that Applied Scholastics was
"gearing up for a partnership with Hazelwood Public Schools...."


That was news to Chris Wright, who fired off a letter to the nonprofit
noting that the school district "has on many occasions declined offers
from your organization" and demanding that the group "refrain from any
future reference to a 'partnership' with Hazelwood School District."


Downs, who publishes an e-mail newsletter called "St. Louis Schools
Watch" and is a regular contributor to the Argus, wrote a follow-up
article about Wright's letter, slated for publication October 13.


At the last minute, Argus publisher Eddie Hasan pulled the story and
replaced it with a press release supplied by Applied Scholastics.


"I might have given them free marketing," Hasan concedes. "But I'm
never one to sit on the sidelines and watch people attack somebody
based on their religion." The decision was partly personal, he says,
stemming from the "mocking" he suffered 30 years ago when he converted
to Islam. Hasan had another beef with Downs' story. "You read Peter's
articles, and they make it seem like Scientology is the big bad wolf,"
says the publisher. "If it is, well, why? I want some facts on the
Applied Scholastics program, and is it effective?"


Downs published his story in his newsletter with an "editor's note"
rebuking Hasan.


UMSL's Judith Cochran reviewed the Supplemental Educational Service
application Applied Scholastics submitted to the state of Missouri.
"It's entirely misleading," Cochran says of the document, noting that
the program applied under the name "Spanish Lake Academy Tutoring
Center/Applied Scholastics." Cochran says the application fails to
include sources for the data it presents as evidence of the program's
effectiveness. "I can't tell where any of their tests were
administered, how long the children were tutored or who did the
testing. They've got to document that," she says.


Missouri only requires that tutoring programs describe their "research
and effectiveness"; the state does not stipulate that independent
observers must weigh in on a program's efficacy -- a step Cochran says
is essential.


The Department of Elementary and Secondary Education stands by its
decision. Dee Beck, the department's coordinator of federal programs,
says the agency did not review Applied Scholastics' texts before
approving the application but has "asked for a set of materials from
this particular provider so we can see for ourselves that they are not
putting forth any ideology."


According to www.tutorsforkids.org, a Web site funded by the U.S.
Department of Education, Arizona and Missouri are the only states that
have approved Applied Scholastics to date. Adams says her organization
has applications pending in other states.


Meanwhile, Washington University education professor Garrett Duncan
says he plans to continue ignoring Applied Scholastics' overtures.
Says Duncan: "Their literature is rather dogmatic, and their pursuit
of me over the last year has shown that same type of zeal. I just
don't feel right about calling them back."


==========

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pitbull
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Post by pitbull » Thu Oct 27, 2005 12:10 am

Mhawthore,

Do you know Carla Jindela and the other clones in St. Louis?

This issue here isn't the benefits of word clearing or other potential benefits of LRH study techniques. The issue is the direct and obvious ties to Scientology Policy that is anything BUT secular.

In Scientology, one is not allowed to investigate and analyize the teaching from the point of view of a professional educator to make proper evaluations.
They expect you to just buy into it wholesale.

Until the church is open and allowes independend study of the techniques involved, it is clear that it is only a tie into the church and the church's managment.

We don't want that for out children in St. Louis or anywhere else.

The church is it's own worst enemy. As such, Scientology policy and managment are suppressive to our kids.
There's an old saying: when the going gets tough - pit bulls call a Scientologist."
-David Miscavige- 8 October, 1993
http://www.earthstation1.com/ThemeSongs/Branded.wav

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Ltricha1
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Post by Ltricha1 » Thu Oct 27, 2005 6:07 am

The problems with study tech as applied by the cult of $cientology.

The student is suppose to accept whatever is written that he/she is reading. If they fail to accept the 'data' they it is the students fault for going past a misunderstood word. Critical thinking is thus punished by forcing the study to reread and word-clear each word of the document.

The punishment takes the form of looking up the word, using it in a sentence, and then clay demoing it. After being forced to do this again and again the student either rejects the idea and quites, which is not allowed or learns to suppress any critical thinking skills and to just accept what is written.

It is a form of hypnotism through force and only one part of the greater part of $cientology responsible for destroying the Id of a person and thus making them easier to control.
[url=http://ocmb.xenu.net/ocmb/viewtopic.php?p=220008#220008]$cientology's real product[/url]
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Tech is the Carrot,
Admin is the Cart,
Ethics is the whip,
Guess who the Horses are.

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