SF Orgs St Hill size?

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exscnmem
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SF Orgs St Hill size?

Post by exscnmem » Mon May 29, 2006 1:29 am

I just got a promo piece from the SF org that said the orgs (day & fdn) went St Hill Size. Anyone know when THIS happened? I know they made an "ideal" org - but St Hill Size? I don't remember reading about that.

They also mentioned that they had 180 staff between the 2 orgs - that seems a little low. And they said they had recently opened 5 new missions. I don't remember hearing about that either.

Anyone in the area know the scoop?

exscnmem

exscnmem
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Post by exscnmem » Sat Jun 24, 2006 4:10 am

I'm going to answer my own post - bad netiquette, I know, but for anyone interested....
I got a big glossy Gateway mag (magazine for the SF Orgs) announcing that they did indeed go St Hill Size. And to my complete surprise, Jerry Ratcheff is the ED of the Day Org! I NEVER in a million years thought that he'd EVER join staff! Anyone else know him? I didn't see his wife (if they're still married) Penny's name - so I guess they couldn't snag her for a Reg - she was a really good one at Mountain View.

Anyway - just wanted to update this.

exscnmem

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Giggles
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Post by Giggles » Sat Jun 24, 2006 4:19 am

Interesting...is there anyway you can
post some pictures from it?
Check out my videos.......
http://www.youtube.com/user/Gigglesvids

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daisy
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Post by daisy » Sat Jun 24, 2006 6:49 pm

exscnmen,

Yes, they went st hill size around LRH's b'day. Jerry Ratcheff has been ED there for approximately 3 years. They snagged quite a few people just to get the numbers they needed for st hill size. I have 2 brother-in-laws and a niece on staff.

It will be just a matter of time until the staff starts dropping off. They were regging any warm bodies they could find and especially any ots. They make ots feel guilty if they don't help out.

Word was that staff were awarded their ot levels for this accomplishment - like that is going to happen!

exscnmem
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Post by exscnmem » Tue Jun 27, 2006 6:24 am

Sorry Giggles, I already recycled it (I can't scan, anyway - not that up-to date).

daisy - thanks for the info - I just really can't believe Jerry actually joined staff - as the ED no less. Showing up Jan, perhaps?
Or maybe can't finish DM's OT 7 unless he does so?

I'm sorry for your family - when I was in, I remember the thrill of the OT levels dangling in front of you. Maybe when it doesn't happen, things will change.

exscnmem

red
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Post by red » Mon Jul 24, 2006 12:33 am

I assume that this is the one on Montgomery Street in a flatiron building we're talking about. I don't have any great inside knowledge to report. I've taken a tour of the DC building, and recently, while visiting a relative in SF, walked by the Co$ on Montgomery Street while walking from the Montgomery Street BART station to the North Beach area several times.

It seemed to be a lot busier and more populated than the DC building was. I talked to one guy outside -- a tall Irish guy from County Waterford.

On another day, I saw several Scientologists doing "free stress tests" near Union Square. It didn't seem like the general public had a lotta interest in getting free stress tests.

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Post by red » Sun Aug 20, 2006 8:17 pm

In the North Beach and Financial District neighborhoods of SF, near the Scientology-owned building on Montgomery Street, there are Scientology-owned newspaper boxes -- the el cheapo plastic kind that often hold real estate and employment advertisements. These newspaper boxes contain fake newspapers (about half the size of a major-city newspaper) featuring L. Ron Hubbard on the front page.

While I was in SF, I adopted the practice of removing all of the "newspapers" from the Scientology-owned boxes whenever I passed a box. I then deposited these "newspapers" in the next trash can I passed. While removing the "newspapers," I noticed that in most (if not all) of the boxes, there is a handwritten, circled number (written in a Sharpie or Sharpie-like black marker) written inside the box. The highest number I recall having seen was "30." I would guess that there are at least 30 of these "newspaper" boxes in the blocks near the Montgomery Street mission.

Anyway, I noticed that I was not the only person who'd been taking stacks of Scientology "newspapers" and throwing 'em in the trash. On several occasions I dumped a stack of 'em in a trash can and saw that someone else had thrown in a thick stack of 'em in the can.

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Ladybird
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Post by Ladybird » Sun Aug 20, 2006 10:36 pm

Re: Orientation: A brave adventure deep into the Church of Scientology's movie theaterBy Tyler Goodboy› a&eletters@sfbg.com">a&eletters@sfbg.com
Bowed as usual by the underrealization of my human potential, I was wandering through the sordid fleshpots of Union Square when destiny appeared in the form of a perky young woman bearing a postcard-size message. "It must be important!" I thought. And it was:

Scientology is the fastest-growing religious movement on earth today. In fact, it is the only major religion to have emerged in the 20th Century.

Past attempts have been surpassed.

You are an immortal spiritual being and you can regain the true joy of being you.

Well, if I gotta be me in perpetuity, True Joy is the shit I wanna be on. What's more, the card was an invitation: "What is Scientology? Find out. See the film. FREE ADMITTANCE with this ticket. BRING YOUR FRIENDS."

Of course, I'd long been intrigued by the testimonies of numerous celebrities who obviously have greater personal integrity than those Kabbalah hooligans. And what was not to love about the L. Ron Hubbard–based, John Travolta–starring, sci-fi movie epic Battlefield Earth, which was like Showgirls in space with longer hair extensions?

As Pascal said, "It is not certain that everything is uncertain." Exactly! This hand-delivered missive was a sign. I needed to get to the Church of Scientology of San Francisco — ASAP!

Several months later (I was busy), yours truly arrives alone — strangely, none of my so-called FRIENDS agreed to be brought — at a gorgeous turn-of-the-century building kitty-corner from the Transamerica Pyramid. Several perky, uniformed women (the male employees are presumably doing more important things on higher floors) leap to attention. I report that somebody has given me a card and, well, you know, free movie and all. They are thrilled by my depth of interest.

Unfortunately, someone is already watching Orientation: A Scientology Information Film in the minuscule yet deluxe screening room, so I am encouraged to take the self-guided tour of displays chronicling Hubbard's awesome life and achievements. The glossy presentation and tony environs are curiously reminiscent of the Wells Fargo Museum.

At last I am ushered in for my very own screening. Celestial choirs break out and CGI meteors hurtle through space as an unnamed Troy McClure–like guide excitedly introduces views of various global Scientology buildings ("This is Celebrity Center International, in Hollywood!"). The real estate beauty pageant is softened slightly by the promise of "millions of Scientologists [ready] to be your friends and help you be you."

After being warned that "materialism is not necessarily true," viewers are contrastingly assured that Scientology really is a religion, "according to more than 65 court decisions around the world." Pull quotes from these decisions are read aloud like critical raves (against a backdrop of a rippling Old Glory). Later, the film also cites an extensive IRS investigation as proof of the church's legitimacy, chirping, "You'll be happy to know your donations are tax deductible!"

The ensuing dazzle of infotainment in Orientation can scarcely be summarized. First, Hubbard's life and achievements are extolled. If "like Siddhartha Gautama, the Buddha, he always insisted he was just a man," he was nonetheless "fully professional in 29" different vocations. Viewers are informed that Scientology's controversy stems from Hubbard exposing the government's attempts at general-population mind control. Uncle Sam held a grudge!

The action then shifts dramatically to a Scientology bookstore, where our McClure-like host smirks, "It looks like we will have to wait [in line] — Ron's books are very popular!" Asked about recommendations for a beginner, a perky young lady assembles a $200-plus pile of "all best-sellers" that viewers are "at liberty to buy." And who wouldn't? After all, Hubbard's books contain "the answers," and "Man has been looking for them for a long time!"

Next comes an enthralling tour of organizational infrastructure, starting with the Borg, I mean the Org — a local headquarters that is "usually a friendly place." A director of processing shows charts of individuals' purported rapid personality and IQ improvements, trashes psychiatrists and psychologists (who criticize Scientology because they are jealous of it), and affirms that "only a raving lunatic would try to hurt Dianetics or Scientology or Scientologists." The camera then spies a sweet-looking matron in a study room. "That housewife intends to audit her whole family when she finishes training," a voice-over announces. Gulp.

It is exciting to hear that in a communications course "one learns how to handle others with communication alone!" But not as exciting as the parade of just-folks who offer frantically edited testimony about how Scientology changed their lives. Identified only by profession, they include a watercolorist ("Scientology made my life fun!"), a Baptist minister ("This is some powerful stuff!"), and such recognizables as Isaac Hayes and Travolta. Kirstie Alley makes a definite impression, saying, "Without Scientology I would be dead, so I can highly recommend it," in the snippiest tone imaginable.

Yet the best is still to come, as the Troy McClure or Ted Baxter type turns to face us for a parting hard sell.

"Right this instant, you are at the threshold of your next trillion years," he says. "You will live it in shivering agonized darkness or triumphantly in the light. If you leave this room after seeing this film — walk out and never mention Scientology again — you are perfectly free to do so. It would be stupid, but you can do it. You can also dive off a bridge or blow your brains out. That is your choice. But if you continue with Scientology, we will be very happy with you. And you will be very happy with you. You will have proven that you are a friend of yours."

This is followed by a somewhat disconcerting text: "Persons appearing in this video are thanked for their contribution which was solely in the form of acting and not as technical nor editorial assistance." No wonder the supposedly real Scientologists onscreen reminded me so strongly of the unique thespian displays in Battlefield Earth.

So — no mention of evil Galactic Confederacy ruler Xenu or his misdeeds of 75 million years ago that resulted in the clustering of bad-vibe "engrams" on human beings that now can be "cleared" due to the miracle of e-meter "auditing"? (Of course, such truths are purportedly only revealed when you've reached the highest levels of Dianetics training after forking out an estimated $360,000.) Worse still, no Tom Cruise, whom I've enjoyed ever so much more since Wacko Jacko left the country and that great all-American man-boy stepped up to fill the outré-behavioral void?

Of course, there is a lot more about Hubbard, Dianetics, and so forth left out of Orientation. You can discover it not only at Church of Scientology offices but also by, say, googling such phrases as "Operation Freakout," "Fishman Affidavit," "space opera doctrines," and "Quentin Hubbard." Visit www.ronthenut.com and www.clambake.org. They too make life fun!

The moment the final credits start rolling, somebody is on my chassis with a questionnaire. Which I duly fill out — though details of my own name, address, e-mail, favorite vegetable, etc., seem to vanish into instantaneous mists of compulsive avoidance. Afterward, perky women grasp like octopuses, insisting I buy a $7 book and schedule a follow-up appointment the next day.

Politely, I make like Elvis and leave the building.

I know what you are thinking: I am not a friend of me. In my cynical urban hipsterdom, am I shunning potential triumph to shiver in eternal darkness? Perhaps I am really nothing but an SP (suppressive person, i.e. any Scientology critic or obstruction). If so, might I become "Fair Game," as Hubbard once labeled public foes who "may be deprived of property or injured by any means ... sued or lied to or destroyed" for the crime of bad-mouthing His Works? After all, the Church of Scientology does appear to spend generous time bowing at the altar of nuisance litigation, especially where journalists are concerned.

But then I recall some vintage wisdom attributed to Hubbard — "I'd like to start a religion. That's where the money is" (1949); "The only way you can control people is to lie to them" (1952); "The South African native is probably the one impossible person to train in the world" (1957); "I'm drinking lots of rum and popping pinks and greys" (1967); "Homosexuality and other irregular practices fall far below an acceptable level of ethics" (timeless) — and I start feeling better. More powerful. More volcanic. More alive.

Thank you, Church of Scientology! SFBG

ORIENTATION: A SCIENTOLOGY INFORMATION FILM

Plays daily

Church of Scientology of SF

701 Montgomery, SF

(415) 864-3940

www.scientology-sanfrancisco.org

This is not the actual name of the reviewer. When not reviewing Scientology cinema, Tyler Goodboy goes by Dylan Badass.

Here is the scientology "Ideal Org" in SF Financial district:

Image

Please google to find out all about the cult buying up historic properties in major cities around the world, and read all about how they are using Sea Org RPF members to build the fancy furnishings and renovate these "investment properties".

Ladybird

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daisy
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Post by daisy » Mon Aug 21, 2006 3:01 am

red:
while visiting a relative in SF, walked by the Co$ on Montgomery Street while walking from the Montgomery Street BART station to the North Beach area several times.
I too was walking on Montgomery beginning of this month after going to a Giants game. There was a girl handing out flyers. I took one, kept walking. When I read it , it was obviously scientology but it didn't come out and say so. It just had the scientology symbol on it. I walked back and handed it to her and said "I don't think so." I regret not having a conversation with her.

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