My story from my Exit Therapy

Share your personal experiences with others. We're not here to judge or criticise, but to share and support.

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i-Betty
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Re: My story from my Exit Therapy

Post by i-Betty » Sun Apr 07, 2013 12:32 pm

Thank you, heyjupiter! :kissysmilies: I've got my tea, I've got my packet of digestive biscuits for dunking, the house is quiet. Starting to read...

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i-Betty
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Re: My story from my Exit Therapy

Post by i-Betty » Sun Apr 07, 2013 5:42 pm

Dearest Wieber, the following are just my notes and thoughts, I don't in any way expect you to respond or feel obliged to revisit your story simply because new members are now reading it following your announcement that you were ready to take that final step towards healing and had signed up for therapy. But - my God - what a story, and...how well you write!
She held up this paperback book and I read, “Diuretics.” And I said, “Diuretics?”

She said, “No.”
Wonderful :D
While I was on staff my pay averaged about $2 a week. The number of hours I worked averaged about 84 a week. Dedicated slave is more accurate than staff member.
My God. How did you feed and clothe yourself? Were you still living with your mum and dad at this point? How interesting, if you were, that you were expected to treat them as something to be 'handled' whilst still accepting their financial support. Twisted, right?
How far back does this go? Did the Christian church start out as a destructive cult? Did Judaism? Did Islam start as a destructive cult as well? What about Buddhism and the eastern faiths?

It would be interesting, informative and useful to have historical research done on this to find out how far back this goes. It would be interesting to see how much war, conflict, injustice and other social ills have some form or other of a destructive cult at their root.

It would be nice if some day in the not too distant future, freedom of mind can be the truth experienced by everyone. For now, I’ll settle for my own freedom of mind.
This passage has given me goosebumps.
This took considerable effort and was fairly painful. Eventually I passed the thing.
Isn't it funny, the things that embarrass us? When was it decided that natural bodily functions should be secret, private, shameful? I think that the tribal, communal way of life has a lot going for it. Having said that, as soon as you have children those things lose any ability they ever had to embarrass you. You see it in all its technicolour glory, day in, day out.
That’s quite an assumption on my part that someone will read this.
100,512 views and counting :)
Henry had discovered he was Henry VIII in his auditing.
*Snort!* I'd be livid to discover I was one of history's most - ahem - colourful characters. Can you demand a second go? Or can you just keep going until you find you were someone society rather approves of? If not, the rules need to change. What a load of arse! Image

(I hate how staff meetings made you feel.)
I had to handle my parent’s antagonism again.

I tell you. That is something that doesn’t go away. It’s called concern, love, caring. Your parents and relatives care about you, are concerned for your well being and love you. That’s why they stay antagonistic to Scientology.
Amen to that.

L.Ron Hubbard sounds like a prize racist. Until they paid for services, I bet, or until a new country needed to be broken open like a bank vault because funds were drying up back home. Convenient Racism.
The overweight guy was treated like a DB by most of the org personnel. DB is short for degraded being. Homeless people you find all dirty, toothless and begging on the street are considered to be DBs. Treating someone like a DB means, essentially, shunning them.
That's what always gets to me about CoS: the fact that society's most vulnerable are treated like biblical lepers. I'm not religious but I watched Pope Francis washing the feet of prisoners, the poor, AIDS sufferers, and stepping out of his Pope Mobile to kiss a profoundly disabled man; I read that he eschewed the Bishop's palace whilst still Cardinal Bergoglio in Buenos Aires, choosing instead a simple flat/apartment, and spending his time amongst the poor and sick. That to me is charity, or religion, if you prefer.

Same with scientology's opinion of the gay community. Unless, of course, they are handing over the dosh. It makes me SICK that entire swathes of the population can be discriminated against simply because of who or what they are...on the say-so of a silly, ignorant little man who devised his religion before the world woke up and realised how ignorant we were being. Or, to look at it from another angle: the only sub-sector of the population that scientology embraces is the one where people have enough money to pay for services, so - actually - I would suggest to those who CoS frown upon, breathe a sigh of relief that you're not a CoS priority 'mark'. I'm sure you're devastated :D
Within a week someone in HCO ordered a review of my performance. The consensus was, “useless but willing.”

LOL! I love you a little bit, Wieber :D
Gack! Wreep! Fotuud!
Hehe, please tell me those are real words? :P


With regards to 'Juan', it astonishes me that somebody can be indoctrinated so quickly. Just two weeks out of the basic course and he was prepared be demeaned? I guess I'd assumed that indoctrination took a long time. This is eye-opening.


Your poor theatre class teacher :(


This is how I see your Little SP:
:dancing7up:
And that's why he dances every time someone blows :)



Right, a hungry clamour has been going on for some time. I shall come back to this.

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heyjupiter
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Re: My story from my Exit Therapy

Post by heyjupiter » Sun Apr 07, 2013 9:08 pm

I am just over half way through these posts now and I am going to read everything that Wieber has to say. I have been greatly moved by what I have read. I do not belong to any religious group and do not ever wish to. The quote Wieber included from Corinthians though defines what being human means to me.

Wieber, you quite frequently mention feelings of remorse at your involvement, guilt about the way you treated others. This proves that you have a conscience, so they didn't win. I don't feel any hostility to you for being a $cientologist. I have read Steve Hassan's book on Cult Mind Control and I know what has been done to you. All I have felt at reading this incredible account is a desperate longing for you to completely recover and be at peace in your life. You have helped countless others I am sure to either get out or never contemplate any involvement with any cult, so what you have suffered will prevent others from suffering.I am sorry for any time you were hungry, tired, afraid, alone, sad, confused, abused.

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Wieber
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Re: My story from my Exit Therapy

Post by Wieber » Mon Apr 29, 2013 7:59 am

I don't know where to start. I've been away from this section for so long.

There is a family member close to me who wanted me to destroy what I had written as my exit therapy.

Instead I edited it a little bit, changed names and posted it. I think I did the right thing.

I'm glad you're getting something from it. Good thing I came back to this section of the board and took a look.

I'm enjoying reading your comments.
“Think wrongly if you please, but in all cases think for yourself.”
Doris Lessing

Image

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Wieber
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Re: My story from my Exit Therapy

Post by Wieber » Mon Apr 29, 2013 8:16 am

I should add that I broke up my exit therapy into three parts.
This thread is essentially my narrative.

Another thread I call 'Essays from my Exit Therapy.'
Mostly that's a deconstruction of various aspects of Scientology
viewtopic.php?f=3&t=27000

Then there's 'Dreams from my Exit Therapy.'
I think that's about the nightmares I had after leaving.
I also posted some of those in the thread on Scientology dreams.
This is the link to my thread on dreams.
viewtopic.php?f=3&t=27524

The way this all came out is I would sit down at the computer, open up the word processor and then whatever was bothering me I would write about it.

I am on another tangent right now. I don't know if I mentioned this in this thread.

I found out about two years ago, reading another person's story that the woman I call Lady MacBeth had died. I don't know the circumstances but from the way it was written she was still involved in Scientology when she died. I was angry with her while I thought she was still with us and I used to imagine meeting her and telling her right off. Finding out she died makes me quite sad.
“Think wrongly if you please, but in all cases think for yourself.”
Doris Lessing

Image

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heyjupiter
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Re: My story from my Exit Therapy

Post by heyjupiter » Mon Apr 29, 2013 12:45 pm

I will read your essays and the thread on dreams. All of these narratives put together serve an important purpose in healing yourself, and helping others. It is natural that you were angry with Lady MacBeth but it is testament to your decency that you felt sad about hearing of her death, especially as she had not managed to end her life free of $cientology. I have just finished reading The Sociopath Next Door and it got me thinking a great deal about conscience, and in particular about the way in which $cientology tries to suppress it.It didn't work on you in the end, that's why you felt sad for Lady MacBeth and why you have expressed feelings of guilt about your time in $cientology.What I have concluded after reading this book - which does not refer to $cientology specifically - is that co$ tries to create sociopaths and that is a very dangerous and damaging mission. Love is the greatest enemy the Church has, and sociopaths do not have the capacity for love.
I am glad that you went ahead with your narrative, despite pressure from your family member. What is really important is that you are now able to make decisions for yourself and be truly self-determined. You know best how to heal yourself, and you should do whatever you have to to achieve this healing. Those around you who love you may be afraid for you and this may manifest itself in some opposition to you telling your story, but it is very important that you do tell it. 8)
Last edited by heyjupiter on Mon Apr 29, 2013 6:38 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Demented LRH
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Re: My story from my Exit Therapy

Post by Demented LRH » Mon Apr 29, 2013 2:15 pm

There are different types of post-cult therapies; everything depends on the psychologist’s background. I described several therapeutic methods at the thread What Would You Say to a Lurking Scientologist? These methods are used mostly by the psychologists who follow the doctrine of behaviorism. Behaviorism is based on positivism; being a positivist, I find these methods very appealing.

Wieber, the request to destroy your writings seems unreasonable to me, especially when it does not come from a psychologist/pscychiatrist.
“This OT shit is driving me insane. On a positive side, I laugh a lot these days because I’m at a funny farm.”
L. Ron Hubbard

L. Ron Hubbard era un maestro de masturbacion fisica y mental.

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heyjupiter
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Re: My story from my Exit Therapy

Post by heyjupiter » Sat May 04, 2013 7:48 pm

Well I have just finished reading 'Essays from my Exit Therapy'.

Thank you :kiss:

I didn't read them all at once- it has taken a few sessions. What I began to notice as read was that questions would pop into my head that I have long wanted answered, and suddenly the appropriate answer would appear in what you had written, just as the question was niggling me again. Some of them were questions that I may have had years ago when I first had involvement with $cientology, and they had been forgotten or buried. Many of them were questions I had feared to ask for fear of ridicule, or even because I was beginning to think I was insane to ask them.
There are so many things you have experienced that I recognise- too many to list without making this post as long as the essays! One thing in particular that I have often noticed was the quality of the letters sent from Org Staff to persuade me to join staff or buy courses or attend events. It always jarred with me that they were often scruffily presented- the hand-writing not even in straight lines across the page, the grammar poor, the language prescribed and stifled. At first these amused me, until I realised that they were written by real people and many times they were obviously newly-recruited staff members because the names changed so often. They had been given important sounding job-titles and were probably still in those early stages of indoctrination, but beyond escape. When I read them after that, it made me incredibly sad for them because many were no doubt very young, like my own child, and I feared for their futures. I was quite moved to read your description of these letters. That is just one tiny example of the many striking truths contained in the thread.

To anyone who has not read the essays, I urge you to do so. They are important and extremely useful to anyone wishing to learn more about how to leave or help someone to leave $cientology, and to aid the recovery of those who are already out..

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