electroshock therapy works very well for certain cases

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gray_geek
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electroshock therapy works very well for certain cases

Post by gray_geek » Mon Aug 01, 2016 12:43 am

I am assuming, this is not known to the scientologists and the non-scientologists.

http://www.ted.com/talks/sherwin_nuland ... ck_therapy

It is worth the time you will spend listening to this amazing testimonial.

Don Carlo
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Re: electroshock therapy works very well for certain cases

Post by Don Carlo » Mon Aug 01, 2016 2:11 am

Over the years some people have argued here that electroshock is carefully considered, for only gravely serious depression, and has much fewer side effects, than decades ago. However, Scientology is still stuck in the 1950's, so they think electroshock is stuck there, too.

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Demented Founder
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Re: electroshock therapy works very well for certain cases

Post by Demented Founder » Mon Aug 01, 2016 1:15 pm

I'm not sure about this. I think it was banned in 1980s, but I might be wrong.
"Cuando el pene de Xenu es adentro de mi culo, estoy inmenso feliz. Eso es manera de que Saentologia funciona. Voy a chingar todos mis aprentizes"
L. Ron Hubbard, Mi Vida Secreta.

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gray_geek
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Re: electroshock therapy works very well for certain cases

Post by gray_geek » Mon Aug 01, 2016 3:12 pm

http://www.businessinsider.com/why-elec ... al-2013-10
written by Erin Fuchs on Oct. 4, 2013, 8:55 AM

The wife of former presidential candidate Michael Dukakis has joined a growing list of people endorsing a mental health treatment once thought of as something like medieval torture — electroconvulsive therapy.

Katherine Dukakis, like other notable people, swears by electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) to treat severe depression.

The once-controversial treatment, formerly known as electroshock therapy, pushes electric currents through patients' brains, intentionally giving them seizures for brief periods.

Doctors don't know exactly how it works, but they believe it "resets" the wonky parts of the brain. It is legal in the United States,[ though it's illegal to give it to patients younger than 16 in Texas and Colorado. In some cases, with the permission of courts, doctors can force very sick patients to get ECT.

One of the more serious side effects of ECT is memory loss. ECT was discovered by accident, like many types of psychotherapy (many of which also have unpleasant side effects like sexual dysfunction).

Physicians began using the treatment in the 1930s after they noticed patients with severe mental illness suddenly got better after they had seizures. In the next couple of decades, ECT got a hideous reputation. The bad rap wasn't completely unwarranted, since doctors used to use such high doses of electricity they broke people's bones. They didn't use muscle relaxers or anesthesia, either.

The Jack Nicholson character in "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest" definitely didn't get knocked out when he got ECT in the iconic 1975 film about a loony bin.

Nicholson's character Randle McMurphy is wide awake and lying on a table as a nurse dabs "conductant" on his temples and a doctor tells him he won't feel any pain. He writhes on the table after the electricity starts coursing through his brain.

The use of shock therapy declined until the 1980s, according to a Surgeon General's report cited by The New York Times. In the '80s reputable doctors began to acknowledge ECT worked remarkably well — as many as 70% of patients improved after ECT, according to that report. Musician Roland Kohloff described his experience with ECT to The New York Times in 1993.

"What I think it did was to act like a Roto-Rooter on the depression," he told The Times. "It just reamed me clear and the depression was gone."

ECT is not only effective, but it's also a lot less scary-looking than it probably was in the '50s. Dr. Oz posted this video of a severely depressed woman who volunteered for ECT because she knew it was the only treatment that would work. Her legs jerk slightly but her face remains expressionless as she gets the shocks.

Of course, some still associate ECT with torture. Just a couple of years ago, Dr. Charles Raison called ECT the "most reviled" treatment in psychiatry.

Given the skyrocketing suicide rate in America, though, psychiatrists will hopefully continue using safe and effective treatments at their disposal — even if the idea of shocking crazy people will always be unpleasant.

Don Carlo
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Re: electroshock therapy works very well for certain cases

Post by Don Carlo » Mon Aug 01, 2016 10:59 pm

Medical science continues to search for better treatments of depression, with fewer side effects, like microcurrents applied to the brain. I, too, hope that electroshock will be replaced by gentler treatments. This contrasts with Scientology, which still uses massive overdoses of niacin in its Purification Rundown, despite it being ineffective and bad for the liver.

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Re: electroshock therapy works very well for certain cases

Post by AngryGayPope » Tue Aug 16, 2016 3:36 pm

Carrie Fisher, who has suffered from bipolar disorder her entire life, swears by it. She complains that, afterwards, she has totally forgotten the last three months of her life.

"But as my age," she said, "what important things do I have to remember?"

Whatever electroshock does, mild doses of it clearly help some people.

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